Rugby World Cup host locations confirmed through to 2033

Decision was ratified at the Annual Meeting of the World Rugby Council in Dublin

The host nations of men's and women's World Cups up to 2033 have been confirmed. Image: Craig Watson
The host nations of men's and women's World Cups up to 2033 have been confirmed. Image: Craig Watson

WORLD RUGBY has confirmed the locations for the next three women’s and two men’s World Cups via the unanimous approval of the organisation’s Council at its Annual Meeting in Dublin.

It has been agreed that –

  • England will host Rugby World Cup 2025 (women’s)
  • Australia will host Rugby World Cup 2027 (men’s) and 2029 (women’s)
  • USA will host Rugby World Cup 2031 (men’s) and 2033 (women’s)

“Today, we have approved three exceptional Rugby World Cup host nations – England, Australia and USA – providing unprecedented certainty and an unparalleled opportunity to accelerate the growth and impact of rugby globally. It is great for rugby, for fans and for the host nations,” said World Rugby Chairman Sir Bill Beaumont.


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“The confirmation of host locations is supported by a new partnership approach to event delivery, that will power long-term, sustainable development, including in the USA and across the women’s game, enabling the sport to realise its global potential on and off the field, driving significant social and economic benefits for host nations.

“Today is a landmark moment for the sport, and an exciting development for fans. I would like to congratulate everyone involved in making this dream a reality as we look to deliver a truly global sport for all.”

World Rugby Chief Executive Alan Gilpin added: “As a sport and an international federation, it is imperative that we continually seek new ways to ensure that the sport converts clear potential into impactful outcomes, and today’s decision reflects that commitment.

“A partnership approach will enable us to develop robust strategic objectives that are great for the host nation and great for rugby and build efficiencies of delivery and resourcing, helping to reduce hosting costs from the outset, while maximising fan engagement, revenue and delivery opportunities. All of which will lead to even greater direct investment back into the game at all levels.


Silver Saturday: Scotland new cap Emma Orr looks forward to Biggar day out at Murrayfield

About David Barnes 2917 Articles
David has worked as a freelance rugby journalist since 2004 covering every level of the game in Scotland for publications including he Herald/Sunday Herald, The Sunday Times, The Telegraph, The Scotsman/Scotland on Sunday/Evening News, The Daily Record, The Daily Mail/Mail on Sunday and The Sun.

2 Comments

  1. Why Australia? Can’t they be more imaginative? China? Argentina? India? If we need to accelerate the spread of the game around the World Aus is hardly doing that. US great choice with 13 pro teams and 120k players and growing. I know others didn’t bid but is that because of lack of encouragement?

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